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« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2007, 11:01:32 am »

Duloxetine Falls Short in Phase III Fibromyalgia Trial


   
November 10, 2007
 

 Duloxetine (Cymbalta) has apparently stumbled on its quest for approval as an agent against pain and other symptoms of fibromyalgia.

Explain to interested patients that this product has not been approved in the United States for treatment of fibromyalgia, but is available for sale and may be prescribed off-label.


Explain to interested patients that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary as they have not yet been reviewed and published in a peer-reviewed publication.
In a 27-week phase III clinical trial, the norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (NSRI) failed to outperform placebo in reducing average pain severity and patient-assessed global improvement, the primary outcome measures, reported researchers at the American College of Rheumatology meeting.


The mean reduction in pain severity at the end of treatment, as measured by the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), was 1.62 points with duloxetine, versus 1.13 points with placebo according to Amy Chappell, M.D., of Lilly Research Laboratories in Indianapolis. The different was not significant.


Patient's Global Impressions of Improvement (PGI-I) scores averaged 3.42 at week 27, compared to 3.73 for placebo. The difference favored duloxetine, but, like the change in BPI scores, it failed to achieve statistical significance.


The results contrasted with earlier randomized studies of duloxetine in fibromyalgia, in which the drug significantly outdid placebo on pain severity measures. The agent is FDA approved for treating depression, generalized anxiety disorder, and diabetic neuropathic pain.


In this study, significant differences between the drug and placebo were seen periodically prior to the final evaluation. Also, duloxetine was significantly superior to placebo on several secondary outcome measures.


For example, on the mental component of the 36-point Short Form Health Survey, duloxetine led to a 3.4-point improvement at study end compared to 0.8 points with placebo (P ≤ 0.05). Mental fatigue declined with duloxetine treatment by 0.99 points on a standard scale, while scores in the placebo group fell 0.02 points (P ≤ 0.05).


Duloxetine had no significant effect on physical function. Overall quality of life was not assessed in the trial.


Discontinuation due to lack of efficacy was significantly more common with placebo (14.9% versus 7.4% for duloxetine, P ≤ 0.05).


On the other hand, more patients on duloxetine stopped treatment due to adverse effects (18.5% versus 11.3% for placebo, not significant). More than 80% of patients in both groups developed some type of adverse effect during treatment.


The study randomized 330 patients to placebo or to either 60 mg/day or 120 mg/day of duloxetine. Patients on one dosage could switch to the other during the trial if efficacy or tolerability was inadequate.


Nearly 84% of patients initially assigned to 60 mg/day escalated to the higher dose during the study.


Cesar Hernandez-Garcia, M.D., of San Carlos Clinic Hospital in Madrid, Spain, was not impressed with the findings.


"Do we believe that a majority of patients with fibromyalgia will benefit from this drug and to be labeled for fibromyalgia will be important? I don't know," he said, shrugging.


Dr. Hernandez-Garcia said he was interested in duloxetine because of the mechanism of action. "Most physicians treat fibromyalgia with anti-depressants," he said.


He said the drug's cost would be a factor in determining whether he would prescribe duloxetine for his own fibromyalgia patients.


Dr. Chappell said Lilly has filed for U.S. approval to market the drug for fibromyalgia, with a regulatory decision is expected in 2008. The company has completed two other phase III efficacy studies in addition to the one reported here.
 
 
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« Reply #31 on: November 12, 2007, 10:04:56 am »

Fibromyalgia Hits Patients Harder than Other Conditions


   
 
November 11, 2007
 

 Patients with fibromyalgia appear to be less able to cope with their symptoms than patients with other rheumatic diseases, researchers reported here.

"The intensity of fibromyalgia syndromes can be overwhelming for the fibromylagia patient and their families, and also very challenging for physicians and nurses treating these patients," Dr. Katz said.


To see whether there were differences in coping skills among patients with rheumatic disease, Dr. Katz and colleaguges asked 110 patients with rheumatic disease to fill out a validated 13-item pain-coping scale; 100 of the patients also completed 13 visual analog scales rating how well they handled their symptoms of pain and fatigue.


Fifty of the patients had fibromyalgia, 22 had rheumatoid arthritis, 13 had systemic lupus erythematosus, nine had regional musculoskeletal pain, seven had osteoarthritis, and nine had other inflammatory rheumatic diseases.


The investigators used the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test to compare the rating of patients with fibromyalgia with those of patients with other conditions.


Fibromyalgia patients aside, there were no statistically significant differences among patients in the other disease categories in their self-rating of their ability to cope.


On 11 of the 13 visual analog scales, fibromyalgia patients also reported significantly worse results than others. The items included "worrying about whether their pain will end, thinking their pain is never going to get better, anxiously wanting the pain to go away, thinking about how much their pain hurts, thinking about how badly they want the pain to stop, not being able to stop thinking about their pain, and feeling overwhelmed, unable to go on, fearful the pain will get worse, unable to reduce their pain intensity, and unable to stand their pain."


Comparing fibromyalgia patients with patients with other rheumatic conditions, the P value for each item was 0.042 or lower.


"This study did not attempt to determine whether fibromyalgia patients have worse coping skills, or that the intensity of their symptoms creates an excess burden, or both," the authors wrote.


"It is possible that the coping strategy of this group is different," he said. "Maladaptive coping may predict greater emotional distress."


It is important, Dr. Katz said, to study coping skills in fibromyalgia patients to develop more effective strategies to help them.


In the meantime, he said, cognitive therapy and other types of psychological support, in addition to empathy from physicians and nurses and understanding from the family, could help fibromyalgia patients contend better with their illness.

 
 
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« Reply #32 on: November 12, 2007, 10:49:06 am »

Marijuana Derivative Said Effective for Fibromyalgia 
Nabilone reduced chronic pain caused by fibromyalgia 



In a placebo-controlled study conducted at the University of Manitoba, Canada, with 40 patients suffering from fibromyalgia nabilone reduced pain and improved quality of life. After a baseline assessment, subjects were either titrated up on nabilone, from 0.5 mg once in the evening to 1 mg twice daily over 4 weeks or received a corresponding placebo. Nabilone is a synthetic THC derivative with similar effects.

There were significant decreases on a visual analogue scale for pain, improvements in the so-called Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, and a significant reduction of anxiety in the nabilone treated group at 4 weeks. There were no significant improvements in the placebo group. Researchers concluded that nabilone "appears to be a beneficial, well-tolerated treatment option for fibromyalgia patients, with significant benefits in pain relief and functional improvement."


(Source: Skrabek RQ, Galimova L, Ethansand Daryl K. Nabilone for the Treatment of Pain in Fibromyalgia. J Pain. 2007 Nov 12; [Electronic publication ahead of print]

NOTE~ www.LupusMCTD.com does not promote nor condone any source of pain treatments. Our site only offers what research is available to the public, for you to research further and to discuss with your Doctor.
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« Reply #33 on: November 14, 2007, 11:46:02 am »

Exercise And Education Helps Women With Fibromyalgia

An exercise program that incorporates walking, strength training and stretching may improve daily function and alleviate symptoms in women with fibromyalgia, according to a new article. These benefits appear to be enhanced when exercise is combined with education about managing the disease.

 
Fibromyalgia affects approximately 3.4 percent of women and 0.5 percent of men in the United States, according to background information in the article. Patients with fibromyalgia experience chronic pain throughout their bodies for at least three months, along with specific sites of tenderness. Causes and mechanisms are poorly understood.

"Even with the recent approval of pregabalin by the Food and Drug Administration to treat fibromyalgia symptoms, pharmacotherapy is often insufficient to resolve persistent symptoms or improve functional limitations and quality of life," the authors write.

Daniel S. Rooks, Sc.D., from Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, and now with Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., Cambridge, Mass., and colleagues recruited 207 women taking medication for fibromyalgia between 2002 and 2004.

For 16 weeks, the women were randomly assigned to four groups: 51 performed aerobic and flexibility exercises only; 51 added in strength training; 50 received a self-help course on managing fibromyalgia; and 55 participated in all the exercises and the education course. The exercise groups met twice weekly, gradually increasing the length and intensity of their workouts, with instructions to perform a third day of exercise on their own.

A total of 135 women completed the study and underwent a six-month follow-up assessment. As measured by two self-assessment questionnaires and one performance test, women who participated in all forms of exercise improved their physical function, an effect that was larger in the combined education and exercise group. "Social function, mental health, fatigue, depression and self-efficacy also improved," the authors write. "The beneficial effect on physical function of exercise alone and in combination with education persisted at six months."

"The present study suggests that progressive walking, simple strength training movements and stretching activities are effective at improving physical, emotional and social function, key symptoms and self-efficacy in women with fibromyalgia who are being actively treated with medication," the authors write. "Furthermore, the benefits of exercise are enhanced when combined with targeted self-management education, and improvements in physical function continue for six months after completion of the intervention. Our findings suggest the need for inclusion of appropriate exercise and patient education in the treatment of individuals with fibromyalgia."


Journal reference: Arch Intern Med. 2007;167(20):2192-2200.

This research was supported by an Arthritis Foundation Investigator Award (Dr. Rooks) and National Institutes of Health grants.

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« Reply #34 on: November 29, 2007, 10:27:48 am »

LITHGOW~Volunteers needed for CSU research


Researchers at Charles Sturt Universitys (CSU) Bathurst Campus are investigating the mechanisms for exercise induced pain relief.

Mr Peter Micalos, lecturer in Human Anatomy and Physiology at the School of Human Movement Studies, is seeking people aged 20 to 60 years with chronic pain syndrome, known as fibromyalgia (FMS), as well as people in good health but with low fitness levels.

They are wanted to participate in a supervised, mild aerobic-based exercise program for eight weeks starting in February 2008.

Mr Micalos said fbromyalgia is characterised by diffuse or specific muscle, joint, or bone pain, fatigue, and a wide range of other symptoms.

�It can be triggered by an acute traumatic event, or have a slow onset from no specific cause and can be debilitating, especially during an acute flare-up.

�It can prevent normal activities such as driving a car, walking up stairs, grooming or dressing.

�There is no universally accepted diagnosis or cure for fibromyalgia, however studies have found individualised exercise programming improves fitness and sleep, and reduces pain and fatigue.�

The study has been approved by the CSU human research ethics committee, and involves clinical tests and individually supervised exercise twice a week at the CSU Bathurst Campus fitness centre.

People with fibromyalgia, or healthy participants, who are interested in participating in the study can contact Mr Peter Micalos on 6338 4505 or pmicalos@csu.edu.au[/size]
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« Reply #35 on: December 09, 2007, 10:41:17 am »

Researchers in Boston have found regular walks and stretching exercises can help ease the chronic pain of fibromyalgia.

In a study of 207 women between the ages of 18 and 75 diagnosed with fibromyalgia, researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard University assigned one group to a twice-weekly aerobic and stretching program for 16 weeks.

Another group added mild strength training, while a third group attended a 2-hour education course every two weeks. A fourth group combined all of the approaches.

The study found an exercise program that included progressive walking and flexibility movements, with or without strength training, improved physical, emotional, and social function.
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« Reply #36 on: December 19, 2007, 11:10:12 am »

An older antibiotic once used against tuberculosis but since abandoned may work to treat the most common and actively contagious form of the disease more quickly, U.S. researchers said on Monday. By substituting a high-dose version of the drug rifapentine for another antibiotic in the standard TB treatment cocktail, researchers cured mice with the disease two to three times faster.

  Daily injections of growth hormone may help reduce pain and improve the quality of life in some patients with fibromyalgia, new findings of a small study suggest. Fibromyalgia, which causes muscle pain and fatigue, is seen more often in women than in men. Muscle spasm and tightness can often be elicited by depressing certain “trigger points” overlying the muscles. The cause of fibromyalgia is unknown, but stress, poor sleep, injury, infections, and other conditions have been linked to the disorder.
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« Reply #37 on: January 09, 2008, 10:20:44 am »

Is there a predisposition for the development of autoimmune diseases in patients with fibromyalgia? Retrospective analysis with long term follow-up

Authors: Kötter, Ina1; Neuscheler, Daniela; Günaydin, Ilhan; Wernet, Dorothee; Klein, Reinhild

Source: Rheumatology International
 

 Abstract:

The objectives of the study were to evaluate the prevalence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and the probability of the development of clinically overt connective tissue diseases. Four hundred and fifty FM patients were compared to 129 healthy matched blood donors.

ANA testing was performed by immunofluorescence on rat tissue sections; in case of highly positive results, ANA were specified further by ELISA and immunodiffusion. All ANA positive FM patients were invited for a control examination. The ANA negative patients received a questionnaire, which was designed to identify those patients with possible connective tissue diseases (CTD).

There was no significant difference in the frequency of ANA or thyroid antibodies between patients and controls (11.6% vs. 7%). Two patients had developed SLE: one was already ANA/anti-dsDNA positive at time of first diagnosis of FM; in the other, specific antibodies and SLE-related symptoms developed after 4.5 years.

The probability for FM patients to develop CTD (SLE) within one year is 0.0027%, which is comparable to the incidence of SLE in the general population (0.005%). The risk of CTD is not increased in FM. The detection of ANA does not predict the development of CTD. However, in individual cases, FM may be an early sign of an autoimmune disease.

Keywords: Fibromyalgia; ANA; Prevalence; SLE; Connective tissue disease
Document Type: Research article

DOI: 10.1007/s00296-007-0413-7
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« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2008, 11:54:19 am »

Disability and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia


Health and Quality of Life Outcomes

 
Published: 22 January 2008

~Abstract (provisional)

~Background
Patients with fibromyalgia often feel disabled in the performance of daily activities. Psychological factors seem to play a pronounced disabling role in fibromyalgia. The objectives of the study are: Firstly, to investigate contributing factors for disability in fibromyalgia. Secondly, to study psychological distress in patients with fibromyalgia as compared to other nonspecific pain syndromes. And finally, to explore the impact of fibromyalgia on a patient's quality of life.

~Methods
In this cross sectional study, explaining factors for disability were studied based on a regression analysis with gender, mental health, physical and social functioning as independent variables. For the assessment of disability in fibromyalgia the FIQ was used. The levels of psychological distress in patients with fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) were compared based on scores on the Symptom Checklist (SCL90). Quality of life of patients with fibromyalgia was compared with scores (SF36) of both patients with fibromyalgia and other health conditions as derived from the literature.

~Results
Disability in fibromyalgia seemed best explained by a patients mental health condition (beta=-0.360 p=0.02). The level of psychological distress was higher in patients with fibromyalgia as compared to patients with CRPS or CLBP (p<0.01). The impact of fibromyalgia on quality of life appeared to be high as compared to the impact of other health conditions.

~Conclusions
Patients with fibromyalgia report a considerable impact on their quality of life and their perceived disability level seems influenced by their mental health condition. In comparison with patients with other pain conditions psychological distress is higher.
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« Reply #39 on: January 24, 2008, 10:29:10 pm »

Lyrica May Relieve Fibromyalgia Pain

"[Lyrica] demonstrated durability of pain relief in patients who responded and it was generally well-tolerated," says researcher Leslie J. Croffiord, MD, professor of rheumatology and women's health at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Side effects included dizziness, sinusitis, joint pain, anxiety, and sleepiness.

Guess who Leslie Crofford is?!?!? MY beloved doctor!!! hehehe

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« Reply #40 on: January 30, 2008, 03:01:27 pm »

 hpydnce you have a good docter     LUAW
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« Reply #41 on: June 02, 2008, 10:47:51 am »

Fibromyalgia Pain Linked With Central Nervous System Disorder



 Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain condition that causes widespread pain and tenderness throughout the body. A University of Michigan study, published in The Journal of Pain, shows that fibromyalgia is associated with central nervous system abnormalities evidenced by patients’ elevated sensitivity to auditory and pressure sensations.

The Michigan researchers studied 31 subjects to determine if there is a global central nervous system problem underlying sensory processing in fibromyalgia patients. They noted that few studies have employed different stimuli in consistent ways and levels of intensity to measure pain sensitivities in this patient group. In this study, fibromyalgia patients and normal subjects were exposed to random auditory and pressure stimuli.

Consistent with prior research, the fibromyalgia subjects in the study showed greater sensitivity to auditory tones and reported higher sensitivity to daily sounds. Further, significant associations were observed between the auditory and pressure responses and support the claim that such abnormalities maybe related to a common pathophysiological mechanism. They also noted that fibromyalgia subjects perceived auditory stimuli to be of the same intensity as felt by control subjects, even though their actual intensity levels were lower.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080531091216.htm
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« Reply #42 on: June 12, 2008, 01:50:27 pm »

Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc. will cut 33 people, or about 8 percent of its employees, to save money.

The Palo Alto company  will also delay clinical testing of two drugs.

Jazz will take a charge of $500,000 in the second quarter related to the layoffs, most of it for severance payments.

A scheduled late-stage clinical trial of a restless legs syndrome treatment will be delayed, as will mid-stage work on an epilepsy and bipolar disorder treatment.

The company will keep working on treatments aimed at fibromyalgia and seizures.
The layoffs will be mostly in research and administration, not in sales.

Samuel Saks, M.D., who helped start the business, is CEO of Jazz. His salary in 2007 was $443,385, according to the company's proxy card, and his total compensation for the year was $1.2 million.

The company also registered with regulators to sell up to $100 million in stock as another way to raise money.
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« Reply #43 on: June 14, 2008, 06:30:02 pm »

New Global Survey Exposes Considerable Burden of Fibromyalgia Including Potential Economic Impact

    - Lack of Physician Education May Contribute to Problem

     A new global survey of fibromyalgia patients and
physicians shows that fibromyalgia, a chronic widespread pain condition,
results in poor quality of life and poses a financial burden on patients often
resulting in an inability to work and earn income. The burden of fibromyalgia
may be further compounded by the fact that in most countries it takes patients on average, 1.9 to 2.7 years and between 2 and 4 physicians to receive an accurate diagnosis.

    According to the survey, lack of physician confidence in recognizing
symptoms of the condition may be contributing to delays in diagnosis. These
new survey findings were released today by the European Network of
Fibromyalgia Associations (ENFA), a coalition of patient advocacy
organizations, and Pfizer Inc, and include findings from the UK, France,
Germany, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Mexico and S. Korea.

    Poor Quality of Life for Patients with Fibromyalgia

    In all countries surveyed, patients with fibromyalgia say they experience
6 to 11 symptoms on average, including chronic widespread pain, sleep
disturbance, fatigue and sensitivity to touch. Many of the symptoms are
described by patients as extremely or very disruptive to the overall quality
of their lives. Patients say the areas of their lives that are most affected
are physical mobility, overall mood, concentration and memory, and motivation
and drive.

    Financial Burden of Fibromyalgia

    Fibromyalgia places a financial burden on patients and can result in
missed work days and limited ability or inability to work. Across all European
countries surveyed, at least 1 in 5 patients said they have been unable to
work and earn an income. Furthermore, one third of patients in Spain, more
than in any other country surveyed, claim they lost their jobs due to
fibromyalgia. In most countries, around half of all patients say they have
missed 10 or more days of work over the last year.

    Diagnosis Can Take Years

    The survey shows that for patients with fibromyalgia, a diagnosis may
take years for a number of reasons. Patients in this survey waited an average
of 5 months (UK) to 1.5 years (Mexico) to consult a physician about their
symptoms because they thought their symptoms would go away or they could
manage them on their own. Once patients have consulted a physician, it can
take on average, 1.9 to 2.7 years and between 2 and 4 physicians to receive an
accurate diagnosis. In Spain, this process was even longer (3.7 years).
    "These survey findings are so important because they expose the
challenges facing people living with fibromyalgia and validate the tremendous
impact of the condition on their lives," says Robert Boelhouwer, President of
the European Network of Fibromyalgia Associations (ENFA). "It is my hope that
these new data will prompt a dialogue about steps that can be taken to improve
diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia so we can reduce the enormous burden
of this chronic pain condition."

    Physicians Lack Confidence in Diagnosing Fibromyalgia

    Contributing to the lengthy process of diagnosis may be physicians' lack
of confidence in diagnosing fibromyalgia. Interestingly, this problem was not
exclusive to primary care physicians since specialists surveyed also report
significant difficulties diagnosing fibromyalgia. In fact, between 16%
(Mexico) and 71% (Korea) of all physicians surveyed say they are not very or
not at all confident in recognizing symptoms of fibromyalgia. Between 25%
(Mexico) and 73% (Korea) of physicians also say they are not very or not at
all confident in their ability to differentiate symptoms of fibromyalgia from
other conditions. According to the survey, insufficient training of physicians
may contribute to the problem. As a result, it was not surprising to see that
a significant proportion of physicians in all countries report the condition
is often or almost always misdiagnosed.
    "The survey findings are worrying because they suggest that physicians
lack knowledge and training in managing patients with fibromyalgia, which is
most certainly contributing to delays in the diagnosis and treatment of the
condition," said Ernest Choy M.D., Department of Rheumatology, GKT School of
Medicine, King's College, London (UK). "It is important that the medical
community and policy makers now take the necessary steps to provide physicians
with the education and training they need to properly and confidently manage
patients with fibromyalgia."

    About Fibromyalgia

    Fibromyalgia is one of the most common, chronic widespread pain
conditions and affects between 16 and 40 million people worldwide.
Fibromyalgia is usually accompanied by poor sleep, stiffness and fatigue along
with other co-morbidities. Fibromyalgia is more prevalent in women, who
account for 87 percent of diagnosed cases; however, men can also be affected.
    The exact causes of fibromyalgia are not yet known. Some scientists
believe that there is an abnormality in how the body responds to pain,
particularly a heightened sensitivity to stimuli. A growing body of evidence
suggests that alterations in the central nervous system may contribute to the
pain of fibromyalgia.

    About the Survey

    The European Network of Fibromyalgia Associations (ENFA) and Pfizer Inc
partnered to develop the Fibromyalgia Global Impact Survey to advance
understanding and aid diagnosis of fibromyalgia. The independent polling
organization Harris Interactive conducted the survey. The survey was supported
by Pfizer Inc. The survey included 800 diagnosed fibromyalgia patients and
1,622 physicians total from eight countries: the UK, France, Germany, Italy,
Spain, the Netherlands, Mexico and S. Korea. In each country, 100 diagnosed
fibromyalgia patients, approximately 100 PCPs (primary care physicians) and
approximately 100 specialists (25 rheumatologists, 25 neurologists, 25 pain
specialists and 25 psychiatrists) were interviewed. Of the 1,622 physicians
surveyed, 1,294 had treated fibromyalgia patients in the last 2 years and 328
had not. Patients who participated in the survey were 18 years of age or older
with the highest percentage of patients (ranging from 30% in Spain and 46% in
Mexico) being between 45-59 years of age. Both females (n=675) and males
(n=125) were included in the survey. Data collection was conducted from
February 25, 2008 through April 17, 2008.

    About the European Network of Fibromyalgia Associations (ENFA)

    The European Network of Fibromyalgia Associations (ENFA) was formed in
September 2004 to increase awareness of fibromyalgia in Europe and provide
support and information to patients and caregivers. There are currently 11
countries part of ENFA including, the UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Netherlands,
Germany, Italy, Denmark, Sweden, Portugal and Israel.



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« Reply #44 on: June 16, 2008, 01:11:55 pm »

Lilly gets OK from FDA to treat fibromyalgia
June 16, 2008




Indianapolis drugmaker Eli Lilly and Co. has received governmental approval to use its anti-depression drug Cymbalta on a new class of patients: those with fibromyalgia.

Lilly said in a statement this morning that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave its approval to use Cymbalta for the chronic illness characterized by widespread pain, tenderness and fatigue.

This is big news for the pharmaceutical company, which has sought to get more bang out of its fastest-growing drug. It submitted an application to the FDA last August.

Cymbalta already is approved to treat major depressive disorder and general anxiety disorder and to manage diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain. Sales of Cymbalta last year were $2.1 billion, up from $1.3 billion in 2006.

Anyone who has chronic, widespread body pain for at least three months without any obvious medical cause meets the definition of fibromyalgia. Other symptoms include fatigue and problems with sleep, focusing and concentration.

It predominantly occurs in people between 20 and 50 years of age, and 80 percent are females. Two to 4 percent of the population has it.

"The approval of Cymbalta is important because it provides physicians and patients with a new treatment option shown to help reduce pain and improve functioning," said Dr. Madelaine Wohlreich, medical advisor and research physician at Lilly, in a prepared statement.

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« Reply #45 on: June 16, 2008, 08:49:05 pm »

nurse_ LUAW Yes I have been on it and I am allergic to it, go figure, I am probably one in a million that is wish it was not true but oh well.....but it's a good idea for anyone that wants to reduce their pain I hear its a wonder drug! take care and thanks for the info Kathy!!!!
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« Reply #46 on: June 16, 2008, 09:12:51 pm »

nurse_ LUAW Yes I have been on it and I am allergic to it, go figure, I am probably one in a million that is wish it was not true but oh well.....but it's a good idea for anyone that wants to reduce their pain I hear its a wonder drug! take care and thanks for the info Kathy!!!!
This came off the news press this morning.
How ironic...just like Lyrica they are going to approve it for Fibro too...
 
I am funny about approving one med created for one disorder then approving it so fast for something totally different.

I was on Vioxx and it helped me when it was pulled off the market.
I was on something else can't remember at this second what it was, but unless it's an "old school drug" I honestly don't trust the newest released drugs. There is no long term  studies done to see what "damage" or "death" happens in statistics to compare it to.

Give me the old stuff made for the correct illness any old day!
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« Reply #47 on: June 23, 2008, 08:57:47 pm »

Fibromyalgia Linked to Neurological Misfiring, Tarzana Chiropractor Treats Patients Without Drugs


On Tuesday, June 24,2008 Gil Kajiki, DC, a board-certified chiropractor who is part of an elite group of physicians who tests and treats patients for neurological fibromyalgia, will lead a seminar at Whole Foods Market in Porter Ranch, just outside of Los Angeles, where he will discuss emerging medical break-throughs linking fibromyalgia to neurological misfirings and answer questions about natural treatments for the condition afflicting millions of people daily.

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) June 23, 2008 -- Gil Kajiki, DC, a board-certified chiropractor who has been treating patients in the Los Angeles area for more than twenty years, is part of an elite group of physicians able to test and treat patients for neurological fibromyalgia, a painful and often debilitating disease. On Tuesday, June 24, Dr. Kajiki will lead a seminar at Whole Foods Market in Porter Ranch, just outside of Los Angeles, where he will discuss this emerging medical break-through and answer questions about treatment for neurological fibromyalgia.

"Fibromyalgia is a condition in which a patient's body actually attacks its own connective tissue. The result is that pain that starts in one region, such as the neck and shoulders, spreads to other areas over a period of time, leading to an expansive list of real and life-altering ailments. Patients who were once labeled as hypochondriacs and given expensive prescription medications to numb the pain are excited to finally receive lasting relief without drugs at our clinic," says Dr. Kajiki.

People with fibromyalgia may experience moderate or severe fatigue with a lack of energy, decreased endurance, pain, or even the kind of exhaustion frequently associated with the flu or a lack of sleep. Muscular or tension headaches, migraine headaches, abdominal pain, bloating, bladder spasms, and sensitivity to temperature changes as a result of skin and blood circulation are just some of the symptoms patients face.

Patients develop fibromyalgia as a result of a physical, chemical or emotional trauma that triggers the body to release an abundance of cortizol that ultimately disrupts the lower and upper brain stem connection, prompting Type-C brain fibers to become overexcited. "Treatment includes a holistic approach to testing, diagnosing and bringing the brain and nervous system back to balance through a combination of therapies that do not involve pain-masking pills, potions, or expensive prescription medications," says Dr. Kajiki. "Our goal is to work with patients to help them return to functioning in their daily lives without feeling dependent on drugs to relieve their pain and other symptoms," he says.

Dr. Kajiki is one of only 200 chiropractors in the U.S., and the only physician in the San Fernando Valley, trained in a new treatment technique to treat neurological fibromyalgia without prescription medication.


MEDIA NOTE: Today, more than 6 million Americans suffer from fibromyalgia. Conventional treatments using traditional western medical treatments have shown limited success, leaving many patients unable to function efficiently at home or work. A new, holistic treatment technique is changing that. Dr. Gil Kajiki schedules time by appointment to demonstrate the therapies used to test and treat patients with neurological fibromyalgia to journalists seeking background information for medical features. Get your questions answered by attending his seminar June 24, 2008 at Whole Foods Market, 19340 Rinaldi Street, Porter Ranch, Calif., 91326. For more information on this treatment or Dr. Kajiki's scheduled August lecture at Whole Foods Market, call or e-mail us today or visit us online at www.drkajiki.com.

http://www.prweb.com/printer.php?prid=1045164
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« Reply #48 on: July 08, 2008, 11:05:07 am »

First results for Phase IIa data of UCB's lacosamide for treatment of fibromyalgiaJune 29,2008


Forward looking statement

This press release contains forward-looking statements based on current plans, estimates and beliefs of management. Such statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to be materially different from those that may be implied by such forward-looking statements contained in this press release. Important factors that could result in such differences include: changes in general economic, business and competitive conditions, effects of future judicial decisions, changes in regulation, exchange rate fluctuations and hiring and retention of its employees.


For the pdf-version of this press release, please click on the attachment (PDF) below:






* Fibro Press Release.pdf (38.42 KB - downloaded 628 times.)
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« Reply #49 on: August 29, 2008, 08:38:24 pm »

Fibromyalgia may be tied to hippocampus malfunction

08/29/2008

Researchers in Egypt found patients with fibromyalgia syndrome had different levels of brain chemicals than did control patients. The findings may indicate a malfunction in the hippocampus, which plays a role in cognitive functions and pain perception.

Info Source:Smart Brief
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« Reply #50 on: August 29, 2008, 08:44:55 pm »

Brain dysfunction may explain fibromyalgia symptoms
Fri Aug 29, 2008

Dysfunction in a portion of the brain may explain some of the symptoms of fibromyalgia syndrome, researchers suggest in a paper published in the Journal of Rheumatology

Dr. Yasser Emad, of Cairo University, Egypt, and colleagues used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine the function of the hippocampus in 15 patients with fibromyalgia syndrome and in10 healthy women who were the same age as the other patients.

The hippocampus is located deep in the front portion of the brain involved in regulating emotions and memory. Functionally, the hippocampus is part of the olfactory cortex, which is important to the sense of smell. The name is from the Greek hippos (horse) = kampos (a sea monster), based on its shape, which resembles a seahorse.

Using spectroscopy, the researchers calculated levels of hippocampus levels of the brain chemicals N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline, creatine, along with their ratios, and compared the findings between the two groups. All study participants also underwent assessments of sleep patterns, cognitive function, and symptoms of depression. The number of tender points on the body was assessed in all patients and a visual analog scale was used to measure pain.

Patient age averaged 35.7 years, and their average disease duration was 18.1 months. All of the patients had cognitive functional impairments on the Mini-Mental State Examination, eight (35.5 percent) were depressed according to the Hamilton Depression Scale, and nine (60 percent) had sleep disturbances. None of the control subjects had any problems in these areas.

"NAA levels of the right and left hippocampi were lower in the patients compared to controls," Emad's team explains. "Another statistically significant difference was observed in choline levels in the right hippocampus, which were higher in the patient group." The fibromyalgia patients also had significantly lower NAA to choline and NAA to creatine ratios compared with the control subjects.

There were no differences between the groups in other metabolites measured or in the choline to creatine ratio.

In the patient group, language scores were significantly correlated with choline and creatine levels, but there was no significant correlation between the levels of the metabolites or their ratios and the number of tender points.

"The hippocampus was dysfunctional in patients with fibromyalgia, as shown by lower NAA levels," the investigators conclude.

Because the hippocampus has a critical role in maintaining cognitive functions, sleep regulation, and pain perception, the researchers suggest that metabolic dysfunction of hippocampus may be implicated in the symptoms of this puzzling syndrome.


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« Reply #51 on: September 04, 2008, 09:41:39 pm »

What a Sleep Study Can Reveal About Fibromyalgia

Research engineers and sleep medicine specialists from two Michigan universities have joined technical and clinical hands to put innovative quantitative analysis, signal-processing technology and computer algorithms to work in the sleep lab. One of their recent findings is that a new approach to analyzing sleep fragmentation appears to distinguish fibromyalgia patients from healthy controls.

Joseph W. Burns, a research scientist and engineer at the Michigan Tech Research Institute (MTRI); Ronald D. Chervin, director of the University of Michigan’s Michael S. Aldrich Sleep Disorders Laboratory; and Leslie Crofford, director of the Center for the Advancement of Women’s Health at the University of Kentucky, report the resultsஐﻬ  of their study in the current issue of the journal Sleep Medicine.

MTRI, a freestanding research institute acquired by Michigan Technological University in 2006 and based in Ann Arbor, specializes in remote sensors that collect data, and in signal processing, using algorithms or computer programs to analyze and correlate the information the sensors gather. MTRI has developed an ongoing collaboration with the University of Michigan’s ஐﻬ sleep laboratory, one of the nation’s leading clinical and research centers specializing in sleep medicine.

This several-year collaboration provided MTRI’s first opportunities to apply quantitative analysisஐﻬ , remote sensing technology and computer algorithms to clinical challenges, said Burns. “In this case, our analyses of sleep stage dynamics suggest potential clinical relevance,” he noted. Newly explored measures of sleep fragmentation seem to correlate—at least in this study—with levels of pain reported by fibromyalgia patients.

Burns, who has a PhD in electrical engineering, finds that more and more of his research is taking a biomedical turn. He and his team are working with Chervin to use ஐﻬ signal-processing technology to record and analyze the brain waves and biophysical responses of children and adults with a variety of sleep disorders. They hope it will help them better understand conventional sleep patterns, as well as diagnose and treat sleep disorders.

They presented the results of research related to assessment of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep fragmentation at Sleep 2008, an international sleep research conference, in Baltimore in June.

Patients who may have sleep disorders often undergo complicated and expensive tests in ஐﻬ sleep laboratories, Chervin explained. These studies collect an assortment of biophysical data that reflect brain, cardiovascular and muscle activity throughout the night. Up to now, these data had to be analyzed manually by highly trained technicians.

“We are collaborating to find new ways to analyze routinely collected data in a way that will be meaningful to the patient’s health and will help us understand how sleep disorders affect brain functions,” he said.

Automated analysis of data potentially can provide improved assessments and reduce the cost of sleep studiesஐﻬ , Burns noted. For example, MTRI and UM have developed an automated technique for assessing the severity of sleep-disordered breathing, using just two signals—brain waves and respiration—instead of the dozen or more signals typically needed for standard visual scoring of a sleep study.

“It may even become possible for people to take sleep tests—simpler and more effective than some of those currently available—at home where they can sleep in their own familiar bedroomsஐﻬ ,” he suggested.

Both partners are reaping the benefits of the collaboration, Burns said. Not only can automated technology improve clinical research; what the MTRI scientists have learned about biomedical techniques such as brain mapping is informing their more traditional work on radar and optical sensing technology.

Michigan Tech and UM have patented the new algorithm for assessing sleep-disordered breathing, which enables them to study what the extra work of breathing does to the brainwavesஐﻬ  of patients with sleep apnea, a sleep disorder in which breathing stops briefly many times during sleep. Sleep apnea has been linked to excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive changes and other health effects, and to hyperactive behavior in children.

The universities have filed an application for another patent for an algorithm that helps automate the assessment of patients with REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. People with this neurological condition act out their dreams during Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, which can cause them to harm themselves or a bed partner while they are asleep.

Burns and Chervin published the results of that study in the December 2007 issue of the journal Sleep.

The team plans to investigate other sleep disorders and to continue to develop automated processing techniques to improve the performance and efficiency of ஐﻬ sleep disorder diagnosis and assessment.

Michigan Technological University is a leading public research university, conducting research, developing new technologies and preparing students to create the future for a prosperous and ஐﻬ sustainable world. Michigan Tech offers more than 120 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in engineering, forestry and environmental sciencesஐﻬ , computing, technology, business and economics, natural and physical sciences, arts, humanities and social sciences.

Internationally renowned for patient care, research and education, the University of Michigan Health System has been a leader in American medicine for more than a century and a half. UMHS includes the U-M Medical School, three nationally ranked hospitalsஐﻬ , 40 outpatient health centers, and a number of specialized programs for treatment and research in cancer, cardiovascular disease, geriatrics, depression, diabetes, vision, women’s health, organ transplant and other specialties. Its biomedical research community is one of the nation’s largest, winning more than ஐﻬ $342 million in funding each year while generating more than 120 newly disclosed inventions annually.


SOURCE: Newswise.
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« Reply #52 on: September 04, 2008, 09:50:19 pm »



Fibromyalgia Symptoms Helped by Following New Weight Loss Diet Revealed in The Ultimate Diet Handbook


September 4, 2008

The newly released Ultimate Diet Handbook by Dr. Raj Banerjee unveils a new diet to relieve chronic health conditions such as fibromyalgia. Symptoms of fibromyalgia are widespread and are accompanied by tender points in different parts of the body. Even though fibromyalgia is known to affect the soft tissues of the body, such as the muscles, tendons, and ligaments - it wreaks havoc in every aspect of a person's life. Fibromyalgia is not a degenerative or a fatal disorder, but the chronic pain is persistent and unforgiving.

Fibromyalgia symptoms (http://www.drbanerjee.com/fibromyalgia-symptoms.html) are often aggravated by stress, unrelated illness or even changes in the weather. The common symptoms of fibromyalgia include widespread musculoskeletal pain, extreme fatigue, and sleep problems. Fibromyalgia sufferers will also have other associated conditions and symptoms like headaches, migraines, impaired concentration, anxiety, depression, rashes and skin sensitivity to name a few. Many sufferers will also experience weight related problems.

Because of the widespread pain in the muscles, ligaments, tendons, and the severe fatigue, many fibromyalgia victims find exercise difficult. This usually results in weight gain. Dr. Raj Banerjee, a leading expert in health and wellness, says, "I have invented a revolutionary new diet that not only will help you with fat loss, but it will also create a natural healthy balance in your body. By eating the right foods in the correct sequence you will notice your chronic health problems disappear."

Dr. Banerjee specializes in designing natural treatment programs for a wide range of health issues. Since 2000 he has successfully applied clinical nutrition protocols based on lab assessments for patients with hormonal imbalances (http://www.drbanerjee.com), fatigue, fibromyalgia and many other health complaints. He is also the author of The Ultimate Diet Handbook, where he reveals his new wildly popular fat loss diet.

This incredible new E-book will explain how to lose weight and how to maintain the weight loss. The Ultimate Diet Handbook teaches dieters how to lose 10 pounds in the first week. This is not about counting calories, no fat diets, or any other fad diets in the market today. It also comes with a Fat Burning Diet Generator which gives dieters a customized daily menu of exactly what to eat for permanent weight loss.

The Ultimate Diet Handbook and the Fat Burning Diet Generator is available online as an instant download and comes with a 60-day no questions asked money back guarantee. To purchase The Fat Loss Diet (http://thefatlossguru.com/blog/) online visit Dr. Banerjee's new website at The Fat Loss Guru (http://thefatlossguru.com/).




Contact Information
Raj Banerjee
The Fat Loss Guru
http://thefatlossguru.com
901-490-3430

SOURCE:NEWSWIRE

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« Reply #53 on: October 28, 2008, 02:15:08 pm »

Lilly receives CHMP negative opinion for fibromyalgia drug

Oct 27, 2008

Eli Lilly and Company has announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a negative opinion on a Cymbalta application for the treatment of ஐﻬ fibromyalgia.

The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) ஐﻬ received data on the use of duloxetine in the treatment of fibromyalgia in 1,411 patients in four placebo-controlled studies and 350 patients in one open-label safety study, a total of 1,761 patients in five clinical trials.

James Russell, global medical director for duloxetine at Eli Lilly and Company, said: "Eli Lilly and Company and Boehringer ஐﻬ Ingelheim are naturally disappointed by the CHMP's opinion. We remain confident in the duloxetine data."

In Europe, duloxetine has been approved for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, major depressive episodes, generalized ஐﻬ anxiety disorder and stress urinary incontinence. Duloxetine was approved in the US for the management of fibromyalgia in June 2008 by the ஐﻬ FDA.
SOURCE:Newswire/LMCTDFஐﻬ
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« Reply #54 on: November 04, 2008, 05:34:55 pm »

Molecular imaging uncovers evidence that symptoms are related to functional brain abnormalities, according to article in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine

Nov. 04, 2008
Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), researchers in France were able to detect functional abnormalities ஐﻬin certain regions in the brains of patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia, reinforcing the idea that symptoms of the disorder are related to a dysfunction in those parts of the brain where pain is processed.

"Fibromyalgia is frequently consideredஐﻬ an 'invisible syndrome' since musculoskeletal imaging is negative," said Eric Guedj, M.D., and lead author of the study. "Past imaging studies of patients with the syndrome, however, have shown above-normal cerebral blood flow (brain perfusion) in some areas of the brain and below-normal in other areas. After performing whole-brain scans on the participants, weஐﻬ used a statistical analysis to study the relationship between functional activity in even the smallest area of the brain and various parameters related to pain, disability and anxiety/depression."

In the study, which was reported in the November issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 20 women diagnosed with fibromyalgia and 10 healthyஐﻬ women as a control group responded to questionnaires to determine levels of pain, disability, anxiety and depression. SPECT was then performed, and positive and negativeஐﻬ correlations were determined.

The researchers confirmed that patients with the syndrome exhibited brain perfusion abnormalities in comparison to the healthyஐﻬ subjects. Further, these abnormalities were found to be directly correlated with the severity of the disease. An increase in perfusion (hyperperfusion) was foundஐﻬ in that region of the brain known to discriminate pain intensity, and a decrease (hypoperfusion) was found within those areas thought to be involved in emotional responses to pain.

In the past, some researchersஐﻬ have thought that the pain reported by fibromyalgia patients was the result of depression rather than symptoms of a disorder. "Interestingly, we found that these functional abnormalities were independent ofஐﻬ anxiety and depression status," Guedj said.

According to Guedj, disability is frequently used in controlled clinical trials to evaluate response to treatment. Because molecular imagingஐﻬ techniques such as SPECT can help predict a patient's response to a specific treatment and evaluate brain-processing recovery during follow-up, it could prove useful whenஐﻬ integrated into future pharmacological controlled trials.

"Fibromyalgia may be related to a global dysfunction of cerebral pain-processing," Guedj added. "This study demonstrates that theseஐﻬ patients exhibit modifications of brain perfusion not found inஐﻬ healthy subjects and reinforces the idea that fibromyalgia is a 'real disease/disorder.'"

According to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, fibromyalgia syndrome is a common and chronic disorder characterized by widespread muscle pain, fatigue and multiple tender points. Tender points are specific places—for example, on the neck, shouldersஐﻬ, back, hips, and upper and lower extremities—where people with fibromyalgia feel pain in response to slight pressure. The syndrome is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal pain and disabilityஐﻬ and affects three to six million, or as many as one in 50, Americans. Between 80 and 90 percent of those diagnosed are women.

Although fibromyalgia is often considered an arthritis-related conditionஐﻬ, it does not cause inflammation or damage to the jointsஐﻬ, muscles or other tissues. Like arthritis, however, the significant painஐﻬ and fatigue caused by fibromyalgia can interfere with a person's ability to carry out daily activities.


Coauthors of "Clinical Correlate of Brain SPECT Perfusion Abnormalities in Fibromyalgia" include Eric Guedj, Serge Cammilleri and Olivier Mundler, Service Central de Biophysique et de Médecine Nucléaire, AP-HM Timone; Jean Niboyet, Patricia Dupont, Eric Vidal and Jean-Pierre Dropinski, Unité d'Etude et de Traitement de laa Douleur, Clinique La Phocéanne, all of Marseille, France.
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« Reply #55 on: December 10, 2008, 11:46:08 am »

Forest Laboratories, Cypress Bioscience fibromyalgia candidate meets goal in late-stage study
December 08, 2008


Forest Laboratories Inc. and Cypress Bioscience Inc. said Monday their fibromyalgia drug candidate met its goals in a late-stage study, confirming prior positive study results.

The drug milnacipran is under review by the Food and Drug Administration, though the companies announced a potential delay in October when the regulatory agency said it was unable to review the application in the time previously provided. It did not provide a reason for the delay.

The drug is under review as a treatment for fibromyalgia, a pain disorder with symptoms ranging from chronic, widespread pain to fatigue.

The latest Phase III, or late-stage, study, confirms prior study results that show the drug improved pain symptoms in patients, the company said. New York-based Forest and San Diego-based Cypress said a full analysis of the study will be completed in the coming weeks.

Shares of Forest Laboratories added 63 cents, or 2.7 percent, to $24.40 in morning trading, while Cypress Bioscience shares gained 45 cents, or 8.6 percent, to $5.69.

SOURCE: Press Release
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« Reply #56 on: December 10, 2008, 11:51:00 am »

New Support for Milnacipran as a Fibromyalgia Treatment

Monday December 8, 2008

A new Phase III clinical trial confirms earlier findings that the drug milnacipran is an effective fibromyalgia (FMS) treatment, according to Forest Laboratories. Forest, along with Cypress Bioscience, is working to get milnacipran FDA approved for FMS. It's currently not approved in the U.S. for any use.

Milnacipran is an NSRI (norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibbitor). It's used in more than 50 countries to treat depression. Forest says this study once again showed that the drug is effective at treating fibromyalgia pain. A full analysis of the study is due out in a few weeks, the company says.

The FDA was expected to make a decision on milnacipran in October but announced that it needed more time to review clinical data. At that time, regulators said they expected to make a decision in a matter of weeks but have not given a more specific timeline. To date, only Lyrica (pregabalin) and Cymbalta (duloxetine) are FDA approved for treating FMS.

Related Content: Milnacipran as a Possible Fibromyalgia Treatment; Drug Treatments for Fibromyalgia

SOURCE: PRESS RELEASE
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« Reply #57 on: December 12, 2008, 03:32:35 pm »

Employed women with fibromyalgia maintain health

Women with fibromyalgia seem to benefit from being employed, maintaining their health status over time, study findings suggest.

However, employment did not appear to protect women from developing the condition, report Dr. Susan Reisine and colleagues at the University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine in Farmington.

Reisine's group reports their findings in the medical journal Arthritis and Rheumatism.

Fibromyalgia, which mostly affects women, is characterized by pain, fatigue, sleeplessness and body stiffness. The cause of this condition is not known and the few studies that have been done report mixed results on the prognosis.

Reisine and colleagues point out that previous research findings have suggest an association between employment and the health status of women with fibromyalgia. To further investigate, they followed 241 mostly white women who had fibromyalgia for an average of 4.9 years. About half of the women were employed.

The women were 47 years old at the start of the study and reported high levels of functional disability, similar to women with rheumatoid arthritis. The women also reported high levels of fatigue and depression, as well as average pain scores of 57 on a low-to-high scale of 1 to 100.

Over 5 years of observation, all health measures, except pain, declined significantly in the group, overall. However, women employed at the start of this observation period reported greater improvements in fatigue, functional status, and depression compared with unemployed women.

"This finding suggests that women with fibromyalgia can remain employed with no negative consequences to their condition," note Reisine and colleagues. They further propose women should attempt to remain employed "as a strategy to maintain better health."

The investigators suggest additional research assess whether race and ethnicity alter the associations reported in this study.

SOURCE: Arthritis and Rheumatism, December 2008.
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« Reply #58 on: December 24, 2008, 01:27:37 pm »

December 23, 2008

The study is being led by Dr. Dennis Ang, Indiana University School of Medicine.

An estimated 60,000-120,000 people in the Indianapolis metropolitan are affected by fibromyalgia, which hampers a person's ability to do normal activities. Many people lose jobs or change jobs to reduce stress levels. Winter is a particularly difficult time for fibromyalgia sufferers as they are often hypersensitive to weather changes -- and tend to stay inside during the winter, which leaves them vulnerable to depression.

The study will be conducted at the National Institute of Fitness and Sports (NIFS) on the Indiana University-Purdue University campus. Subjects will be compensated for their time. To learn more about the fibromyalgia studies, call the information line at (317) 278-3971, or visit the secured Web sites at: https://data.biostat.iupui.edu/fibromyalgia/main.aspx.
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« Reply #59 on: January 05, 2009, 12:28:38 pm »

Finding relief from fibromyalgia
January 4, 2009


Tears rolled down the face of Sharon Ostalecki as she spoke about her journey to find relief from fibromyalgia at the premiere of a documentary at the Townsend Hotel in Birmingham. Ostalecki went to 37 doctors in seven years before receiving a diagnosis of the condition causing pain, fatigue and sleep disturbances. Since then she has worked to educate the public as well as physicians. Her most recent project was Fibromyalgia: Fitting the Pieces Together, a 90-minute DVD on the often misunderstood collection of symptoms. Like Ostalecki, many patients go from physician to physician in search of answers.
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Ostalecki came up with idea for the documentary after lecturing throughout Canada, Michigan and Ohio with Dr. Martin Tamler, residency program director of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Beaumont Hospitals and medical adviser for the project. Mort Crim Productions filmed the 13 chapters about the syndrome at Beaumont Hospitals in Royal Oak and Troy, and the University of Michigan Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center in Ann Arbor.

"We decided the documentary would be a way to reach out to those who wanted to come to the lectures and couldn't," said Ostalecki of Novi. "People want to know about the basics of what it is, how is it diagnosed, how to treat it. We looked at physical therapy and treatment, nutrition and decided who would be the best to do that chapter. Not enough physicians in Michigan have time to treat fibromyalgia patients because patients present with different symptoms. It would help if we could educate them to go in to properly communicate with their physicians."

Ostalecki ended up approaching nearly a dozen specialists in fibromyalgia for the documentary. Three received awards during the evening - Tamler, Dr. Ananias Diokno, executive vice president and chief medical officer at Beaumont Hospitals, and Dr. Daniel Clauw, director of U-M's Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center.

Tamler's been treating fibromyalgia patients for 17 years. He compares the way the condition is viewed to depression back in the 1980s. Tamler is in the middle of fibromyalgia research project which may have a huge breakthrough in the next couple of months.

"Primary care physicians didn't want to make a diagnosis of depression then Prozac came out," said Tamler of Birmingham. "I think we're going to see now with two new medications primary care physicians can actually treat fibromyalgia and start to accept the condition. Back before the 80s it was considered a psychosomatic condition. The documentary is one step to educating patients and physicians."

Clauw spoke of a multidisciplinary approach to treating the condition which can be complicated by irritable bowel syndrome and TMJ.

"Everyday we're learning more about fibromyalgia," said Clauw. "We can see in the brain that patients have an increased volume control of pain."

Diokno urged patients not to hide their suffering. It's estimated 10 million people have the condition worldwide.

"It's a common condition," said Diokno. "Seven percent of the population have it."

Dr. Dennis Dobritt, director of the Pain Institute at Providence Hospital in Southfield, spoke about injections into the trigger points of pain and that first degree relatives have an eight times higher risk of developing the condition. Loren DeVinney, a physical therapist in West Bloomfield, said pain leads to tightness and the need for release. Dr. Craig Hartrick, director of anesthesiology research at Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, told of new medications like Lyrica and Cymbalta (an anti-depressant) and said patients should have hope.

HOPE (Helping Our Pain and Exhaustion) is the name of the support group Ostalecki founded for fibromyalgia patients. The response has been so overwhelming that meetings are moving from the Farmington Community Library to Beaumont Hospital where Ostalecki presents a series of six classes starting in September. On May 1, Jones & Bartlett Publishers releases her new book, 100 Questions and Answers about Fibromyalgia, with Tamler. Her first book, Fibromyalgia: The Complete Guide from Medical Experts and Patients, came out in June 2007.

Ostalecki is only too happy to share her experiences. Twenty years later she has found relief by sleeping eight hours a night; eating enough protein, fruits and vegetables; avoiding refined flours and sugar; and practicing yoga or stretching daily. She says there is no cookie cutter recipe to treat fibromyalgia and some patients control symptoms through chiropractic care, meditation and water aerobics. Ostalecki takes a warm water bath at night and sips hot chocolate.

Massage relieves the pain for Mark Montagano who appears in the documentary. The former Redford resident says he "walked away from doctors" to find his own solution.

"Be knowledgeable, do your reading and never give up," said Montagano, "Biofeedback helps with stress that has to do with your condition and support of family is important."

For more information or to order the documentary, visit www.hffcf.org or call (248) 344-0896. Ostalecki is currently in the process of scheduling showings at the end of February or beginning of March at the Birmingham Palladium.

SOURCE: News Release
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I look normal, as I have an "Invisible Illness". You can not catch it, you can not see it. It's called Lupus.My body is attacking itself on the inside.
www.LupusMCTD.com Represents:
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